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Talcum Powder : Our Attorneys Stand Up For Ovarian Cancer Victims

In recent years, evidence has emerged that products containing talc, such as baby powder, are linked to an increased risk of ovarian cancer. Shuttlesworth Lasseter, LLC is reviewing cases on behalf of women who have been diagnosed with ovarian cancer after using these products 

What are talcum powder products?

Talcum powder is made from talc, a mineral consisting mostly of magnesium, silicon and oxygen. It absorbs moisture and reduces friction. Talc-based products can help keep the skin dry and prevent rashes.

Many women have used talcum powder products to keep the groin cool, comfortable and odor-free. Lawsuits have alleged that over time, talc-based powder may enter the vagina and travel through the uterus and fallopian tubes to the ovaries. Some women may also have been exposed to talcum powder by way of birth control products that were sprinkled or coated with the powder.

What are the risks associated with talcum powder?

Most published medical research indicates that there is a link between long-term use of talc-based products and ovarian cancer. Some research indicates that talcum powder is a contributing factor in thousands of cases of ovarian cancer every year. The connection between talc and cancer has been known for decades, with the first study linking the two published in 1971. A landmark study released in 1982 found that women who regularly use talcum powder on their genitals are nearly twice as likely to develop ovarian cancer.

What is the basis for talcum powder lawsuits?

Even though manufacturers have known about the risk of ovarian cancer for decades, talcum powders still do not include any warnings regarding that risk.

Two products are at the center of lawsuits: Johnson's Baby Powder and Shower to Shower, both produced by pharmaceutical giant Johnson & Johnson. Lawsuits filed by women who have used those products for decades allege that the company failed to warn them of the dangers associated with use.

One notable case in 2013 found that Johnson & Johnson negligently failed to warn women about the risk of ovarian cancer when using talc-based powders near their genitals. In early 2016, a court ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay $72 million to the family of Jackie Fox. She had died of ovarian cancer the previous year after using Johnson's Baby Powder for many years.

Contact Shuttlesworth Lasseter, LLC for a free consultation

To protect your legal rights after being harmed by talcum powder, you will need an experienced attorney on your side. If you have been diagnosed or lost a loved one to ovarian cancer, contact us today. Call 866-583-1885.

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